19 April 2024

A YEAR OF PROGRESS FOR CHILDREN IN CHINA AND BEYOND

Building on over 40 years of cooperation with the Government of China, in 2023 UNICEF continued to work towards realizing the rights of the world’s second largest child population, who make up approximately 13 per cent of the world’s children. UNICEF worked with 25 partners in 217 counties or districts across 31 provinces, autonomous regions or municipalities to achieve results for children, especially the most vulnerable.To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for children in China and beyond, UNICEF continued with its ‘pilots to policy to scale’ approach: UNICEF brings innovation and international expertise; the Government of China brings resources. Meeting the SDGs in China is essential if the world is to achieve these goals.UNICEF made progress across child health and development, education, child protection, social policy, and South-South cooperation. To name just a few examples, UNICEF and its partners:Trained almost 748,000 health professionals in early essential newborn care.Trained more than 95,000 community health workers in early childhood services, and over 290,000 community health workers in infant and young child feeding (IYCF).Reached more than 1.1 million children and over 74,000 teachers with higher quality, more accessible, and more equitable education.Published data on children affected by migration to inform the government’s action plan.Supported the development of the Law on Building Barrier Free Environments.Helped regulators keep children safe online.Advocated for policies that expand childcare services, particularly for rural areas.Developed an industry standard for the design and use of AI relating to children.Drafted standard operating procedures for police and prosecutors for taking a victim-centred approach to child victim support.Developed a Nutrient Profiling Model to regulate unhealthy food marketing to children in China.Developed an interactive platform for sharing and visualizing child environmental health indicators.UNICEF also continued to work with partners in China to accelerate the progress of other developing countries towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals through South-South cooperation.There is much work still to be done if we are to reach the most vulnerable children in China, including children in less developed regions, children with disabilities, and children affected by migration. Join us to realize the rights of every child.
19 April 2024

Protection from violence, exploitation, abuse and neglect, for every child

UNICEF aims for all children to be safe from violence and neglect by strengthening child protection systems with prevention and response services. In 2023 UNICEF worked with government partners to strengthen these services for more than 2 million children in need across 4 provinces and successfully advocated for the inclusion of this model in local and national policies for vulnerable children. UNICEF also worked with government partners to develop standard operating procedures (SOPs) to support child victims of abuse, which will standardize the operations of the 2,053 ‘one-stop’ service centres in China once approved.To change norms and practices that favour violent discipline, UNICEF launched the second phase of a positive parenting campaign in collaboration with government partners. The campaign gives parents practical tips on building trust and empathy with their children, and it garnered 90 million impressions online and in-person. Positive parenting sessions have been offered to more than 20,000 caregivers so far.To promote a protective legal framework, UNICEF supported consultations and provided recommendations for The Law on Building Barrier Free Environments, adopted in September 2023. The Law includes provisions on accessible infrastructure, information, and social services for children with disabilities.To protect children online, UNICEF informed the development of an industry standard for the design and use of AI products for children, by supporting roundtables with AI practitioners and experts. The State Council approved the Regulations on Minors’ Online Protection in September, clarifying stakeholders’ accountability, establishing prevention and response mechanisms for cyberbullying and online violence, and defining ‘harmful information’. The provisions on the responsibilities of companies and child-centred design reflect inputs provided by UNICEF’s experts.
19 April 2024

A YEAR OF PROGRESS FOR CHILDREN IN CHINA AND BEYOND

Building on over 40 years of cooperation with the Government of China, in 2023 UNICEF continued to work towards realizing the rights of the world’s second largest child population, who make up approximately 13 per cent of the world’s children. UNICEF worked with 25 partners in 217 counties or districts across 31 provinces, autonomous regions or municipalities to achieve results for children, especially the most vulnerable.To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for children in China and beyond, UNICEF continued with its ‘pilots to policy to scale’ approach: UNICEF brings innovation and international expertise; the Government of China brings resources. Meeting the SDGs in China is essential if the world is to achieve these goals.UNICEF made progress across child health and development, education, child protection, social policy, and South-South cooperation. To name just a few examples, UNICEF and its partners:Trained almost 748,000 health professionals in early essential newborn care.Trained more than 95,000 community health workers in early childhood services, and over 290,000 community health workers in infant and young child feeding (IYCF).Reached more than 1.1 million children and over 74,000 teachers with higher quality, more accessible, and more equitable education.Published data on children affected by migration to inform the government’s action plan.Supported the development of the Law on Building Barrier Free Environments.Helped regulators keep children safe online.Advocated for policies that expand childcare services, particularly for rural areas.Developed an industry standard for the design and use of AI relating to children.Drafted standard operating procedures for police and prosecutors for taking a victim-centred approach to child victim support.Developed a Nutrient Profiling Model to regulate unhealthy food marketing to children in China.Developed an interactive platform for sharing and visualizing child environmental health indicators.UNICEF also continued to work with partners in China to accelerate the progress of other developing countries towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals through South-South cooperation.There is much work still to be done if we are to reach the most vulnerable children in China, including children in less developed regions, children with disabilities, and children affected by migration. Join us to realize the rights of every child.